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"It always amuses me that the biggest praise for my work comes for the imagination, while the truth is that there’s not a single line in all my work that does not have a basis in reality. The problem is that Caribbean reality resembles the wildest imagination.”—Gabriel García Márquez from The Art of Fiction No. 69, The Paris Review "It always amuses me that the biggest praise for my work comes for the imagination, while the truth is that there’s not a single line in all my work that does not have a basis in reality. The problem is that Caribbean reality resembles the wildest imagination.”—Gabriel García Márquez from The Art of Fiction No. 69, The Paris Review "It always amuses me that the biggest praise for my work comes for the imagination, while the truth is that there’s not a single line in all my work that does not have a basis in reality. The problem is that Caribbean reality resembles the wildest imagination.”—Gabriel García Márquez from The Art of Fiction No. 69, The Paris Review "It always amuses me that the biggest praise for my work comes for the imagination, while the truth is that there’s not a single line in all my work that does not have a basis in reality. The problem is that Caribbean reality resembles the wildest imagination.”—Gabriel García Márquez from The Art of Fiction No. 69, The Paris Review "It always amuses me that the biggest praise for my work comes for the imagination, while the truth is that there’s not a single line in all my work that does not have a basis in reality. The problem is that Caribbean reality resembles the wildest imagination.”—Gabriel García Márquez from The Art of Fiction No. 69, The Paris Review "It always amuses me that the biggest praise for my work comes for the imagination, while the truth is that there’s not a single line in all my work that does not have a basis in reality. The problem is that Caribbean reality resembles the wildest imagination.”—Gabriel García Márquez from The Art of Fiction No. 69, The Paris Review "It always amuses me that the biggest praise for my work comes for the imagination, while the truth is that there’s not a single line in all my work that does not have a basis in reality. The problem is that Caribbean reality resembles the wildest imagination.”—Gabriel García Márquez from The Art of Fiction No. 69, The Paris Review "It always amuses me that the biggest praise for my work comes for the imagination, while the truth is that there’s not a single line in all my work that does not have a basis in reality. The problem is that Caribbean reality resembles the wildest imagination.”—Gabriel García Márquez from The Art of Fiction No. 69, The Paris Review "It always amuses me that the biggest praise for my work comes for the imagination, while the truth is that there’s not a single line in all my work that does not have a basis in reality. The problem is that Caribbean reality resembles the wildest imagination.”—Gabriel García Márquez from The Art of Fiction No. 69, The Paris Review


"It always amuses me that the biggest praise for my work comes for the imagination, while the truth is that there’s not a single line in all my work that does not have a basis in reality. The problem is that Caribbean reality resembles the wildest imagination.”—Gabriel García Márquez from The Art of Fiction No. 69, The Paris Review


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Ben Tarnoff, author of The Bohemians: Mark Twain and the San Francisco Writers Who Reinvented American Literature is doing an AMA at 3pm! Go to reddit.com/r/books to ask him questions about these four writers. 
The members of the bohemians are: A young Mark Twain, escaping the draft and seeking adventure; literary golden boy Bret Harte; struggling gay poet Charles Warren Stoddard; and beautiful, haunted Ina Coolbirth, poet and protectorate of this band of lost boys. 

Ben Tarnoff, author of The BohemiansMark Twain and the San Francisco Writers Who Reinvented American Literature is doing an AMA at 3pm! Go to reddit.com/r/books to ask him questions about these four writers. 

The members of the bohemians are: A young Mark Twain, escaping the draft and seeking adventure; literary golden boy Bret Harte; struggling gay poet Charles Warren Stoddard; and beautiful, haunted Ina Coolbirth, poet and protectorate of this band of lost boys.