"Putting Penguin's great books in the hands of great educators; because what you read matters."

Adam Goodman interviews Alfredo Corchado about returning to Mexico, his place of birth, as an American journalist:
"In the back of your mind you’re saying, ‘How far can I go? How much can I … ’ And a lot of us, American and Mexican journalists, have talked about this, often, like, you can talk about people being killed, you can talk about body counts and all that shit, but when you really start to follow the money and the corruption, and the senators and the diputados, and the government officials … I don’t think we’ve done it yet, and I think some Mexicans that I’ve talked to will say, ‘Ahí está el límite.’ It will be interesting for us as Americans, too, if we someday get that smoking gun. I haven’t gotten it yet, but I’m still waiting for that document that puts two and two together. I know that based on what I’ve done — the reporting — I know that el pacto [the 2007 peace pact story] was, to me, the limit. There was a part of me that kept thinking, ‘They don’t give a shit if I’m an American citizen.’ They can make it look like an accident, you know? You’re in a cab and — I don’t know. Maybe it’s a conspiracy. Maybe I’ve been living in Mexico too long. You know, you get into conspiracies. But you also know that Paisana’s right: you’re a little fly to them, and they’ll find a way to swat you. So I think the optimism that I have, or the sense of security and confidence that I have in my US passport also has certain limits.”
Read the whole thing here.

Adam Goodman interviews Alfredo Corchado about returning to Mexico, his place of birth, as an American journalist:

"In the back of your mind you’re saying, ‘How far can I go? How much can I … ’ And a lot of us, American and Mexican journalists, have talked about this, often, like, you can talk about people being killed, you can talk about body counts and all that shit, but when you really start to follow the money and the corruption, and the senators and the diputados, and the government officials … I don’t think we’ve done it yet, and I think some Mexicans that I’ve talked to will say, ‘Ahí está el límite.’ It will be interesting for us as Americans, too, if we someday get that smoking gun. I haven’t gotten it yet, but I’m still waiting for that document that puts two and two together. I know that based on what I’ve done — the reporting — I know that el pacto [the 2007 peace pact story] was, to me, the limit. There was a part of me that kept thinking, ‘They don’t give a shit if I’m an American citizen.’ They can make it look like an accident, you know? You’re in a cab and — I don’t know. Maybe it’s a conspiracy. Maybe I’ve been living in Mexico too long. You know, you get into conspiracies. But you also know that Paisana’s right: you’re a little fly to them, and they’ll find a way to swat you. So I think the optimism that I have, or the sense of security and confidence that I have in my US passport also has certain limits.”

Read the whole thing here.

(Source: lareviewofbooks, via thepenguinpress)

  • 11 September 2013
  • 17